jachstjr on dating sites - Dating the workplace

A workplace romance is considered a relationship that occurs “between two members of an organization where sexual attraction is present, affection is communicated, and both members recognize the relationship to be something more than just professional and platonic” (Horan & Chory, 2011, p. Beyond the 47% involved, about 20% indicated they were receptive to an office romance. Statistics indicate that anywhere from 40-47% of employees surveyed had been involved in a workplace romance.If nobody seems to notice, there's no reason to share. You and your new partner need to agree on some ground rules and come up with a plan for how you will keep it professional and stay within written or unwritten rules. "You may have the burden of overcompensating with professionalism and keeping an artificial distance, which can be an awkward strain," says Taylor.

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Signs in New York’s Times Square flash, “Zippergate.” Electronic banners in London’s Leicester Square guffaw “Ovalgate and Oralgate.” Radios and televisions blare interviews and commentary as sophisticated as teenage locker-room jokes.

Rapid-fire e-mail messages around the globe share lewd digitally altered pictures of a lecherous chief executive and his naughty playmate.

Focus on work and do your job — especially if you want to mitigate gossip.

"No one wants to hear about how deeply you're in love with each other or where you went last weekend or the fight you had in the car this morning," she explains. Again — nobody wants or needs to know about what's happening with your love life.

Quick backstory: We didn't meet on the job — we were dating for almost four years before we started working together (which, by the way, wasn't planned … But for about 11 months, we sat three cubes apart from one another and kept our relationship under wraps. People sometimes act differently at work than they do in their personal life. No need to send a blast email with "the news" of you and your cube-mate's new relationship.

But they happen all the time, and when they do, there are three possible outcomes: The relationship turns sour and your reputation and career take a beating; it ends, but you're both mature and cordial and don't let the breakup affect your work; or A survey by Career Builder last year revealed that nearly 40% of employees admitted to having a romantic relationship with a coworker, and almost one-third of office relationships result in marriage. We are getting married in two months.) It's up to you to figure out whether pursuing an office relationship is worth the possible consequences, good and bad. My situation was unique because we were already a couple before we started working together — but generally that isn't the case, and Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and the author of "Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job," suggests you try being friends in-and-outside the office before you make any moves.

If you think a collegial relationship you have might be morphing into a more amorous one, consider the ethical implications of letting this happen.

When two daters occupy the same work space, the ramifications for their love affair failing are substantially more significant.

Yet, while Larry King, Rush Limbaugh and the Washington Post revel in increased revenues, HR pros know they’re watching a dramatic display of the dangers of office liaisons—threats to worker competence, lowered productivity, demoralized co-workers, secrecy, potential conflict-of-interest, and worst of all, claims of invasion of privacy and sexual-harassment lawsuits.

We may titter, but even with all of the problems, we also know it won’t go away. Predictably, because of the glitz and visibility of recent cases, there’s a rush to prevent similar bad outcomes throughout every level of society.

A software firm has a product that offers drop-down lists of choices for HR’s preferred responses to office romances.

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